Conducting In-Person RESEAs Under WIOA? 

Address UI Claimants’ Specific Needs with LEAP

It’s a proven fact: unemployment insurance (UI) claimants are finding jobs faster under the U.S. Department of Labor’s (USDOL) Unemployment Insurance Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessments (RESEA) program. This initiative provides in-person assessments of UI claimants, as explained in this article

One effective approach--integrating RESEAs with reemployment or career services--is modeled on the method used in Nevada, which has proven to be successful by USDOL studies. Nevada uses Career Action Resources’ material in its reemployment program, deemed by USDOL reports as the best in the nation.

RESEA Focuses on Meeting UI Claimant Needs

The RESEA initiative focuses on providing career services that directly relate to the specific needs of participating claimants.

Claimants have a variety of needs based on their specific circumstances, and appropriate reemployment services can be provided for successful employment outcomes, including referrals to education and training, to further reemployment goals.

Because the same reemployment service types are not appropriate for all claimants, the individual needs of each claimant should be determined, and the appropriate services provided.

How LEAP Helps Your Staff Better Serve UI Claimants

So how can workforce development agencies and staff serve UI claimants effectively, consistently, uniquely, and in person? How can you help customers develop a reemployment plan that addresses the claimant’s specific needs?

USDOL Research on REA / RESEAs Describes LEAP for UI Claimants

Consider using the same tool as Nevada does: Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP). After all, as described earlier, Nevada has the most successful reemployment program of the states studied.

“LEAP has been noted by staff to be very useful not only in gauging the emotional and financial status of individuals, but also for referring them to much-needed services,” states the USDOL study. The report calls LEAP an “innovative” self-assessment and gives an example from the JobConnect office in Reno, Nevada: “The interviewer requires each claimant to fill out the LEAP before the interview, and then reviews the claimant’s scores, to alleviate some of the issues that had been raised while also referring him/her to available services.”

The report continues, “LEAP, developed by Career Action Resources, LLC, is handed out by every local office providing RESEAs in both Arizona and Nevada. It assesses individuals in eight areas: finances, emotions and attitudes, health and social support, use of time, next career, education and training, job search, and use of services and resources.” The study concludes that such self-assessment is a “best practice” for workforce reemployment programs.

LEAP, therefore, is a proven tool to help your agency and staff meet the requirements of the RESEA program while assisting UI claimants. LEAP will help your UI claimants assess their concerns and obtain guidance tailored to their needs on job searching, training, skills, and much more--all in a quick, easy-to-use format. LEAP also results in a personalized reemployment action plan and helps staff refer job seekers to their most-needed services and resources.

Since its publication, LEAP has focused on the importance of tailoring reemployment plans and services to each job seeker’s needs. The one-size-fits-all information that UI claimants and dislocated workers usually receive will not suit their needs completely and may not address their unique issues and barriers. Career Action Resources is gratified that the USDOL has decided to make the LEAP’s approach of determining UI claimants' needs for targeted and tailored career services and reemployment planning part of the RESEA program.

Read LEAP testimonials.

Learn about LEAP’s Second Edition changes.

Workforce professionals: Request a complimentary LEAP sample for review.

 

 


Career Action Blog

We say these things everyday: “The unemployment rate is low.” “People are finding jobs faster.” “Employers can’t find enough workers.”
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The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Division of New Media, part of the U.S. Department of Labor, has made it easier to understand the key data behind these trends through videos.

The official BLS YouTube channel features short videos on important employment and labor market information, which is used for planning, guidance, and decision-making.
 

Here are the BLS videos we find most interesting at explaining complex facts in a clear, uncomplicated way:

  • Understanding BLS Unemployment Statistics (length 1:24 minutes)
  • Understanding BLS Employment Projections (length 3:17 minutes)
  • A Look at Occupational Employment in the United States (length 3:30 minutes)
  • Understanding BLS Projections of Occupational Separations (length 2:53 minutes) 

Learn more here

 

 

 

States have new flexibility in administering the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program, according to guidance issued by the U.S. Department of Labor. The following elements are the new core components of a RESEA that must be included in the initial session with an unemployment compensation claimant:

  • UI eligibility assessment, including a review of work search activities and an adjudication referral if an issue or potential issue is identified
  • Labor market and career information that addresses the claimant’s needs
  • Enrollment in Wagner-Peyser Act-funded Employment Services
  • Support to develop and implement an individual reemployment plan
  • Information and access to American Job Center (AJC) services and referrals to reemployment services and training to support the claimant’s return to work

As in the past, initial and any subsequent RESEAs must be provided one-on-one and in-person. Here is a comparison of key changes. This comparison has been shortened for space.

 

FY 2017 Requirements

FY 2018 Requirements

Summary of Changes

UI eligibility assessment and referral to adjudication if an issue is identified

UI eligibility assessment, including review of work search activities and referral to adjudication if needed

Clarifies that review of claimant’s work search is part of eligibility assessment

Requirement for claimant to report to AJC

No similar requirement

States have discretion to require participants to report to AJC or alternative location, such as libraries or schools. RESEA services must continue to be provided in-person.

Orientation to AJC services

No similar requirement

States have discretion to continue orientation services as allowable activity.

Registration with state’s job bank

No similar requirement

States have discretion to require registration with job bank as allowable activity.

Development or revision of individual reemployment plan that includes work search, accessing services through an AJC or using self-service tools, and/or training

Providing support to claimant to develop and implement an individual reemployment plan

States have discretion to use alternative approaches to support individual reemployment plans. These approaches must be tailored to claimant’s needs and require some one-on-one interaction.

Provision of at least one additional career service, such as
--Coordination with other workforce activities, including WIOA Dislocated Worker Program
--Labor Exchange, including information about in-demand industries and occupations 
--Career readiness activities, including assistance with resumes

Providing access to AJC services and referrals to reemployment services and training to support claimant’s return to work

Career services is an allowable RESEA activity that may be charged against RESEA grant. However, states are no longer required to provide these services during RESEA session(s).

 

Read the entire Unemployment Insurance Program Letter 8-18 here, including information on funds still available for FY 2018.

Looking for a proven and fast way to help claimants create tailored individual reemployment plans, plus give consistent structure to your one-on-one RESEA meetings? Request complimentary review samples of the best-practice, self-guiding employment tools, published by Career Action Resources.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, American Job Centers are working to adapt to changing needs and challenges. In addition, as required by WIOA, American Job Centers must move toward enhanced integration, customer-centered service delivery, and dynamic partnerships.

But as automation, technology, the gig economy, and other trends affect the future of work, as well as our service delivery, how will we serve job seekers and businesses in the future? How will we keep essential human connections, do effective outreach, and give customized personal service?

Workforce representatives from eight states have collaborated and envisioned possible service delivery solutions for tomorrow's American Job Centers.


work.pngTo gain insight into these issues, you can watch a Webinar featuring these workforce representatives and learn about their recommendations for the future of American Job Centers. You can also read the Webinar transcript. 

Want to give your job seekers customized reemployment and job-seeking guidance now? Request complimentary review samples of  Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES).