Free Information from Experts at Career Action Resources

Career Action Resources publishes two complimentary digital information sources for workforce development and career services professionals:

 

Also check out these fine resources from the U.S. Department of Labor that are helpful for job seekers:

Occupational Outlook Handbook. Research careers, education/training, pay, and prospects with this reliable online resource. The employment projections cover a 10-year period, making the OOH ideal for students, job seekers, and anyone developing career and education plans.

O*NET Online. Use the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) database to explore jobs organized in different ways, such as by career cluster, industry, outlook, and education level. Also learn about green jobs and in-demand jobs.

Workforce Development &
Career Services Professionals:

Learn about Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES).


Career Action Blog

It takes effort to conduct a successful job search. If your job seekers jump into a job hunt without planning, it may take longer than expected to get hired. Here are 10 blunders to watch for, according to Career Action Resources, LLC:

  1. Not knowing their skills and what they want to do. If job seekers don't know what they are qualified for, have them pinpoint their skills and focus their search. Use MyNextMove from the U.S. Department of Labor.
  2. Procrastinating. A job search may take longer than most people realize, so they should get started right away. 
  3. Being disorganized. How will job seekers track jobs they've applied for? How will they know when to follow up with employers? Encourage the unemployed to use a calendar or other tool to plan job search activities.
  4. Making errors. Remind job hunters to proofread their submissions.When Job Searching Drags On--How to Help Unemployed [Career Action Blog].png
  5. Applying for everything. Suggest to job seekers that they don’t apply for every opportunity. They won’t make it past applicant tracking systems that search for qualifications. 
  6. Using the same resume and cover letter for every opening. If your job seekers want to get job interviews, they need to make it easy for employers to see how their qualifications fit an opening. Suggest they tailor correspondence to match the job ad and employer needs.
  7. Not researching employers. By learning about employers and their needs, job seekers can more effectively prove they are right for a job. For example, if Company X is expanding a call center, they will realize the business will need candidates with solid customer service experience. 
  8. Not contacting employers directly. Job seekers don’t have to wait for a job to be advertised. If they like a certain company, they can express their interest.  ‚Äč
  9. Winging it in job interviews. Job hunters should prepare for interviews. They should be ready to answer common questions.
  10. Forgetting to follow up. Job seekers should thank the interviewer and send a thank you. Then they should follow up and restate their interest.

Need help guiding job seekers in effective job searching? Career and workforce development professionals: Request a complimentary review sample of Your Employment Search (YES). YES assesses job search strengths and barriers, opens a person's eyes to the best methods for getting hired, and leads to a personal employment search strategy tailored to individual goals.

 


 

Have you checked out the redesigned WorkforceGPS? It’s the online technical assistance website from the U.S. Department of Labor created just for workforce development professionals. The site’s purpose is to help build the capacity of America's public workforce investment system through useful tools and research—all in one place.

workforcegpsThe first thing you’ll notice on WorkforceGPS.org is that it looks better than ever, and the navigation is more intuitive.

But the new WorkforceGPS.org received more than just a makeover. The changes made are all based on feedback from users.

These changes include the following, according to the site:

  • Simplified interface
  • Easier log in
  • Improved and streamlined search function that allows you to sort results by title, relevance, newness, or popularity, and you can customize other search criteria
  • Easier way to navigate, search, and find peers in the Member Directory

Learn more and watch a brief overview video.

 

Looking for ways to improve outcomes for job hunters and employers? Be sure to investigate a central online tool for workforce professionals from the U.S. Department of Labor. Called Workforce System Strategies (WSS), the resource offers more than 1,000 evidence-based research and emerging practice reports.

The WSS database covers job search assistance, employer engagement, partnerships, case management, and many other workforce development issues. The research describes methodology, major findings, and recommendations. Learn more at Workforce System Strategies: Your Home for Evidence-Based Research and Emerging Practices.

Did You Know? In a "high causal evidence" study cited by the U.S. Department of Labor, only one reemployment tool—Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP)—is described. LEAP is published by Career Action Resources, LLC.