New! LEAP Reemployment Tool Published in Second Edition

Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner, Second Edition As you know, helping laid-off individuals is a challenge. Each laid-off worker has different worries. Many find it difficult to create an action plan for reemployment.

Across the nation, American Job Centers, reemployment programs, and career services have turned to a concise tool, Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP), to help dislocated workers organize and move forward on their key concerns. LEAP combines self-assessment, guidance, and planning into a 6-panel format. LEAP answers the key question of “What do I do now?” by helping laid-off workers gain clarity on their top issues and develop personalized action steps.

New Second Edition Recently Published

LEAP has just been released in a completely updated new Second Edition, announced its publisher, Career Action Resources, LLC. The Second Edition reflects input from customers, an increased focus on social media and technology in the job hunt, implementation of the Health Insurance Marketplace, and much more. LEAP Administrator’s Guide has been completely revised for the Second Edition.

Second Edition Changes and Highlights

Highlights of LEAP, Second Edition, improvements and changes include the following:

  • Gives information on the Health Insurance Marketplace for people who have lost their employer health coverage
  • Makes additional references to skills, especially transferable skills
  • Includes a reminder to UI claimants to report a return to work, which is required by law so unemployment benefits can cease
  • Provides references to social media for job hunting
  • Lists 2-1-1 and free online career tools from the U.S. Department of Labor as additional resources
  • Streamlines content and includes other changes to make LEAP easier and faster to complete

LEAP is used in the nation’s most-effective reemployment program, according to a study for the U.S. Department of Labor. It is considered an “innovative” best practice for reemployment programs, states the same study.

Help your dislocated workers take a LEAP to reemployment. Learn more about LEAP.

Workforce Development &
Career Services Professionals:

Conducting in-person RESEAs under WIOA? Address UI claimants' specific needs with LEAP.


Career Action Blog

“This Jobs Program Just Might Get People Back to Work” is the title of a recent Pew Trusts article that describes the success and expansion of the U.S. Department of Labor’s RESEA (Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment) program, particularly in Nevada.

The story details how Nevada’s RESEA program has the best results of all the states studied, saving more than four times the RESEA costs and shortening participants' unemployment insurance benefits by approximately three weeks.

Nevada’s RESEA program “significantly reduced the amount of time people received unemployment benefits,” states the Pew Trusts article by staff writer Sophie Quinton.

Nevada uses Career Action Resources assessment guides with its RESEA participants. In particular, our Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) is described in the first RESEA (then called REA) study commissioned by the U.S. Department of Labor as an “innovative self-assessment” that helps claimants identify their needs.

Learning About Your Scores in Step 2 of LEAP, Second Edition.jpgThe USDOL report also states LEAP is useful to workforce staff by helping them better refer claimants to much-needed services. Nevada is now using Your Employment Search (YES) in its RESEA program. Read more about the RESEA research.

Need proven tools to guide UI claimants, job seekers, and staff? Request a complimentary review sample of LEAP and YES.


#wkdev #wioa 
 

Do you have job seekers who can't seem to get hired? They may appear to be doing everything right, but they may actually be passive job hunters, according to the Editors at Career Action Resources. Here are 3 signs that individuals are being passive in their employment search.

  1. Only applying for job after job online. Online job applications are a key way to apply for jobs. But online applications have pitfalls. First, if a person's skills and experience do not match the opening, an application may be automatically rejected. Second, if an individual is applying for many jobs, chances are he or she is not a good fit for all of them. Third, they are missing opportunities to job search in more effective ways, such as networking with people who can connect them to hiring managers. Encourage job hunters to target their search and go beyond online applications.
  2. Not tailoring a cover letter and resume to each job. Using the same cover letter and resume for each job is easy; it is also passive. Instead, ask job seekers to take some time match their materials to the job opening. It may help to emphasize qualifications that especially fit the opening. This approach makes it easier for employers to see how an applicant meets their needs.
  3. Spending just a few hours a week on their job search. Suggest that job seekers create a schedule of job search activities, including applying for jobs, networking, researching and contacting employers, and practicing interview skills.

Your Employment Search [Career Action Blog]The good news is, all job hunters can become more active in the search for employment. With an active job hunt, they'll be more likely to get hired quickly in the right job.

Need help explaining to your job seekers how an active employment search works? Consider using Your Employment Search (YES). a best-practice tool for tailored job search guidance, in your career centers. Workforce development professionals can request a complimentary review sample of YES from Career Action Resources, LLC.

 

 

Job seekers have more skills than they may realize. A new online tool from the U.S. Department of Labor lets job hunters rate themselves on 40 workplace skills and then learn their best-fit career options.

Called the “Skills Matcher,” the tool gives individuals immediate results to 

  • Increase their skills awareness and skills language.
  • Find careers that interest them and suit their skills.
  • Explore careers they hadn’t considered.
  • Plan their career and training paths.
  • Learn the wages, education, and outlook for careers that match their skills.
  • Target a job search.
  • Explain to employers how their skills match a job.
  • Enhance a cover letter, resume, and online profile with skills language.

In the Skills Matcher, job seekers rate their level of each skill as beginner, basic, skilled, advanced, and expert. It includes examples of each skill to help with the ranking.

The Skills Matcher compares a person’s skill rating to the knowledge, skills, and abilities of more than 900 O*NET occupations. Try out the Skills Matcher, available on the CareerOneStop site.