Best Practices / Reemployment Results

  • Career Action Resources’ Material: Innovative Best Practice in Nation’s Most-Effective Reemployment Program

  • Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner Is ONLY Tool Described in U.S. Department of Labor Study on Reemployment Program Success

 

Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES) are helping thousands of job hunters across the USA to assess their needs and to create job search and reemployment plans.

In research for the U.S. Department of Labor, our material is identified as an innovative best practice for reemployment.

Specifically, the study explains how LEAP is used to assess unemployment insurance (UI) claimants in the nation’s most-effective reemployment program. LEAP is the only self-assessment described by researchers in the report!

Learn more about the study below.

Good-bye, UI

IMPAQ International researched the effectiveness of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) initiative. Note: The initiative is now called the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program; its name was changed with the implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

Among the best practices for reemployment, the study recommends “rigorous assessment forms to identify barriers to employment....Perhaps the most innovative self-assessment form is the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP), which is used in Nevada.”

The research found Nevada has the most effective REA program of the states studied. The study explains LEAP is useful to claimants participating in REAs by helping them identify their needs. The report also states LEAP is useful to REA staff by helping them better refer claimants to much-needed services.

Excerpt from Report for U.S. Department of Labor on LEAP

The IMPAQ International study states the following:

LEAP “assesses individuals in 8 areas: finances; emotional issues; social, family, and health issues; use of time; next career; more education and training; job search; and use of services and resources. Claimants are asked 10 questions in each of these sections gauging their concerns on a variety of topics. Answers range from 1 to 4 for each question, with 1 denoting a minor concern and 4 denoting a major concern. 

“Claimants total their scores on each section and then look to the back of the LEAP form for suggestions on how best to alleviate their concerns in each of the 8 LEAP areas. Use of the LEAP form differs by local office, with some requiring claimants to fill it out during or before the REA interview and others providing it at the end of the interview for claimants to use at home. 

“At the Reno JobConnect, for example, the REA interviewer requires each claimant to fill out the LEAP form before the REA interview, and then reviews the claimant’s scores, to alleviate some of the issues that had been raised while also referring him/her to available services. 

“The LEAP form has been noted by REA staff to be very useful not only in gauging the emotional and financial status of individuals, but also for referring them to much needed services.”

Complete Study Describing LEAP at U.S. Department of Labor Website

The complete IMPAQ report is available for download at the U.S. Department of Labor's WorkforceGPS site.

Follow-Up Study

A follow-up IMPAQ study for the U.S. Department of Labor found Nevada’s REA participants had 3.13 fewer weeks on UI compared to individuals in the control group, saving $873 in benefits payout per REA participant. This amount exceeded REA costs by more than 4 times. 

LEAP and YES Testimonials on Effectiveness and Results

The organizations using LEAP and YES continue to give positive feedback on their effectiveness with job hunters and the unemployed. 

One program administrator said, “We love LEAP. It helps the unemployed think of the many issues they are facing and verbalize what they are worried about. We wouldn’t get to some issues without LEAP because people are overwhelmed by stress. LEAP gives them a tool for moving forward. LEAP also helps our staff. LEAP also works with newly laid off people, because they are not thinking clearly.”

Workforce Development &
Career Services Professionals:

Conducting in-person RESEAs under WIOA? Address UI claimants' specific needs with LEAP.

Learn about Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES).


Career Action Blog

You can view a recorded U.S. Department of Labor webinar on “Unemployment Compensation for Individuals Affected by the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19).” The webinar discusses recently provided guidance (UIPL 10-20) for states regarding unemployment compensation (UC) flexibilities related to Coronavirus 2019.

The webinar moderator was Michelle Beebe, Division Chief, U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration. The presenter was Gay Gilbert, Administrator, U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration.

Find the webinar, along with an executive summary and transcript, here.

 

 

A joint UIPL/TEGL released by the U.S. Department of Labor gives details on initial Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessments (RESEAs). Below is a brief version of some of the information from the USDOL in the letter. See the full USDOL letter here.

Initial RESEA--The term “initial RESEA” refers to the first meeting between a RESEA service provider and a UC claimant who reported to the meeting in response to an official notification of selection and required participation in RESEA services. For reporting and planning purposes, the initial RESEA session is “completed” when the following components have been provided:

 

  1. A UC eligibility review that is conducted on a one-on-one basis, which must include review of work search activities, and referral to adjudication if an issue or potential issue(s) is identified.
  2. Customized labor market and career information based on an assessment of the claimant’s needs.
  3. Enrollment in the Wagner-Peyser Act-funded Employment Service program.
  4. Support, to the extent needed, for the claimant in the development of an individual reemployment plan tailored to the claimant’s needs.
  5. Information and referral to additional reemployment services and other American Job Center services, resources, and training, as appropriate.

 

The above list identifies the minimum requirements for an initial RESEA, and states may include additional activities or services as part of their service delivery designs. Importantly, completion of the initial RESEA does not necessarily terminate a claimant’s enrollment in RESEA, given that it does not include many of the reemployment services that may support the claimant’s return to work. States have flexibility in their service-delivery design to include subsequent RESEA sessions and referral to additional reemployment services.

 

Need a useful, proven tool for job hunters in your RESEA program. Learn about LEAP and YES by Career Action Resources, LLC.

 

 

Maximum Fiscal Year (FY) 2020 Unemployment Insurance (UI) Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) Grant Awards by State

From U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration

State                               FY 2019 Funding Limit                   FY 2020 Funding Limit

ALABAMA                      $994,163                                           $1,192,995

ALASKA                            $346,369                                           $415,643

ARIZONA                          $885,821                                           $1,062,986

ARKANSAS                        $542,018                                           $650,421

CALIFORNIA                        $15,467,355                                     $18,560,826

COLORADO                        $496,100                                           $595,320

CONNECTICUT                  $1,856,915                                       $2,228,298

DELAWARE                       $724,438                                           $796,881

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA      $771,319                                           $848,451

FLORIDA                            $6,928,506                                       $7,621,357

GEORGIA                          $1,019,150                                       $1,222,980

HAWAII                              $1,245,906                                       $1,370,497

IDAHO                                $875,294                                           $962,823

ILLINOIS                                $1,665,945                                          $1,999,134

INDIANA                            $5,425,160                                       $5,967,676

IOWA                                $1,895,736                                       $2,274,884

KANSAS                             $896,970                                           $1,076,364

KENTUCKY                         $1,102,519                                       $1,323,023

LOUISIANA                        $2,057,299                                       $2,263,029

MAINE                            $868,626                                             $955,489

MARYLAND                     $1,478,014                                       $1,773,617

MASSACHUSETTS              $7,259,554                                       $7,985,509

MICHIGAN                        $2,634,528                                          $3,161,433

MINNESOTA                     $1,810,521                                       $2,172,626

MISSISSIPPI                         $1,200,680                                          $1,320,748

MISSOURI                         $945,060                                           $1,134,072

MONTANA                    $796,868                                             $876,554

NEBRASKA                       $616,516                                           $678,168

NEVADA                         $2,584,481                                       $2,842,929

NEW HAMPSHIRE              $1,616,108                                       $1,777,718

NEW JERSEY                     $2,355,706                                       $2,826,848

NEW MEXICO                    $721,970                                           $844,874

NEW YORK                       $24,032,798                                     $26,436,077

NORTH CAROLINA             $5,386,081                                       $5,924,689

NORTH DAKOTA                $592,813                                           $652,094

OHIO                               $4,015,514                                       $4,818,617

OKLAHOMA                       $1,159,258                                       $1,275,183

OREGON                           $5,741,685                                       $6,315,854

PENNSYLVANIA                  $1,840,561                                       $2,208,674

PUERTO RICO                    $397,284                                           $476,741

RHODE ISLAND                  $1,373,776                                       $1,511,154

SOUTH CAROLINA              $1,556,260                                       $1,867,511

SOUTH DAKOTA                 $432,943                                           $476,237

TENNESSEE                       $3,258,519                                       $3,584,371

TEXAS                              $9,348,178                                       $11,217,813

UTAH                               $2,152,773                                       $2,368,050

VERMONT                         $864,079                                           $950,487

VIRGIN ISLANDS                $419,985                                           $461,984

VIRGINIA                          $2,024,343                                       $2,226,777

WASHINGTON                   $11,439,335                                     $12,583,269

WEST VIRGINIA                 $407,096                                           $488,516

WISCONSIN                      $3,609,976                                       $3,970,974

WYOMING                       $495,112                                           $644,623