Best Practices / Reemployment Results

  • Career Action Resources’ Material: Innovative Best Practice in Nation’s Most-Effective Reemployment Program

  • Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner Is ONLY Tool Described in U.S. Department of Labor Study on Reemployment Program Success

 

Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES) are helping thousands of job hunters across the USA to assess their needs and to create job search and reemployment plans.

In research for the U.S. Department of Labor, our material is identified as an innovative best practice for reemployment.

Specifically, the study explains how LEAP is used to assess unemployment insurance (UI) claimants in the nation’s most-effective reemployment program. LEAP is the only self-assessment described by researchers in the report!

Learn more about the study below.

Good-bye, UI

IMPAQ International researched the effectiveness of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) initiative. Note: The initiative is now called the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program; its name was changed with the implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

Among the best practices for reemployment, the study recommends “rigorous assessment forms to identify barriers to employment....Perhaps the most innovative self-assessment form is the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP), which is used in Nevada.”

The research found Nevada has the most effective REA program of the states studied. The study explains LEAP is useful to claimants participating in REAs by helping them identify their needs. The report also states LEAP is useful to REA staff by helping them better refer claimants to much-needed services.

Excerpt from Report for U.S. Department of Labor on LEAP

The IMPAQ International study states the following:

LEAP “assesses individuals in 8 areas: finances; emotional issues; social, family, and health issues; use of time; next career; more education and training; job search; and use of services and resources. Claimants are asked 10 questions in each of these sections gauging their concerns on a variety of topics. Answers range from 1 to 4 for each question, with 1 denoting a minor concern and 4 denoting a major concern. 

“Claimants total their scores on each section and then look to the back of the LEAP form for suggestions on how best to alleviate their concerns in each of the 8 LEAP areas. Use of the LEAP form differs by local office, with some requiring claimants to fill it out during or before the REA interview and others providing it at the end of the interview for claimants to use at home. 

“At the Reno JobConnect, for example, the REA interviewer requires each claimant to fill out the LEAP form before the REA interview, and then reviews the claimant’s scores, to alleviate some of the issues that had been raised while also referring him/her to available services. 

“The LEAP form has been noted by REA staff to be very useful not only in gauging the emotional and financial status of individuals, but also for referring them to much needed services.”

Complete Study Describing LEAP at U.S. Department of Labor Website

The complete IMPAQ report is available for download at the U.S. Department of Labor's WorkforceGPS site.

Follow-Up Study

A follow-up IMPAQ study for the U.S. Department of Labor found Nevada’s REA participants had 3.13 fewer weeks on UI compared to individuals in the control group, saving $873 in benefits payout per REA participant. This amount exceeded REA costs by more than 4 times. 

LEAP and YES Testimonials on Effectiveness and Results

The organizations using LEAP and YES continue to give positive feedback on their effectiveness with job hunters and the unemployed. 

One program administrator said, “We love LEAP. It helps the unemployed think of the many issues they are facing and verbalize what they are worried about. We wouldn’t get to some issues without LEAP because people are overwhelmed by stress. LEAP gives them a tool for moving forward. LEAP also helps our staff. LEAP also works with newly laid off people, because they are not thinking clearly.”

Workforce Development &
Career Services Professionals:

Conducting in-person RESEAs under WIOA? Address UI claimants' specific needs with LEAP.

Learn about Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES).


Career Action Blog

Looking for ways to improve outcomes for job hunters and employers? Be sure to investigate a central online tool for workforce professionals from the U.S. Department of Labor. Called Workforce System Strategies (WSS), the resource offers more than 1,000 evidence-based research and emerging practice reports.

The WSS database covers job search assistance, employer engagement, partnerships, case management, and many other workforce development issues. The research describes methodology, major findings, and recommendations. Learn more at Workforce System Strategies: Your Home for Evidence-Based Research and Emerging Practices.

Did You Know? In a "high causal evidence" study cited by the U.S. Department of Labor, only one reemployment tool—Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP)—is described. LEAP is published by Career Action Resources, LLC.
 

 

As the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) marks its 70th birthday in 2019, the Editors at Career Action Resources have assembled this brief look back at its origins and history using information from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) website.

OOH 2006-2007
The cover of the 2006-07 OOH, as published by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The first version of the handbook, called “Occupational Outlook Information,” was issued in August 1946. It was prepared at the request and under the financial support of the Veterans Administration to make information available to returning World War II veterans about the need for general education and for trained personnel in various occupations. 

In answer to many requests, an Occupational Outlook Handbook was then published in spring 1949 and sold to the public. Subsequent editions of the Handbook were published in 1951, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, and biennially in even-numbered years starting in 1966. 

The BLS assembled and wrote the OOH, which became a very big book and a nationally recognized, respected source of career information. With each edition, the BLS updated the 10-year employment projections for hundreds of occupations and made many updates and changes to the in-depth occupational descriptions, plus added new jobs, as the economy changed.

For 2010-11, the BLS published the final OOH print edition. At that point, the OOH went solely online, although some publishers continued to offer printed versions for sale to bookstores, workforce programs, libraries, schools, and other customers.

To this day, the OOH continues to provide comprehensive, up-to-date, and reliable labor market information and descriptions for our economy’s jobs, always with an eye toward the future. It gives essential facts and figures about prospective changes in the world of work and the skills and qualifications that will be needed by tomorrow’s workforce. The OOH has helped millions of Americans plan their education and work lives.

Happy 70th Birthday, OOH!


 

 

The U.S. Department of Labor has launched a new effort to reduce improper Unemployment Insurance (UI) payments across the nation.

ui map

"Providing states with resources to recognize and combat improper Unemployment Insurance payments is a critical piece of our federal-state partnership," U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta said, according to a USDOL news release. "I have contacted governors across the nation and asked them to recommit to lowering the UI improper payment rate in their state. The Department stands ready to help states with high level of improper payments by providing targeted assistance."

In addition, the USDOL has published a redesigned "Unemployment Insurance Payment Accuracy by State" webpage that show each state's improper UI payment rate. The page offers information on each state's root causes of improper payments and other data.

Need help guiding UI claimants and the unemployed to employment? Workforce development professionals: Request a complimentary review sample of Your Employment Search (YES).