Best Practices / Reemployment Results

  • Career Action Resources’ Material: Innovative Best Practice in Nation’s Most-Effective Reemployment Program

  • Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner Is ONLY Tool Described in U.S. Department of Labor Study on Reemployment Program Success

 

Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES) are helping thousands of job hunters across the USA to assess their needs and to create job search and reemployment plans.

In research for the U.S. Department of Labor, our material is identified as an innovative best practice for reemployment.

Specifically, the study explains how LEAP is used to assess unemployment insurance (UI) claimants in the nation’s most-effective reemployment program. LEAP is the only self-assessment described by researchers in the report!

Learn more about the study below.

Good-bye, UI

IMPAQ International researched the effectiveness of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) initiative. Note: The initiative is now called the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program; its name was changed with the implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

Among the best practices for reemployment, the study recommends “rigorous assessment forms to identify barriers to employment....Perhaps the most innovative self-assessment form is the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP), which is used in Nevada.”

The research found Nevada has the most effective REA program of the states studied. The study explains LEAP is useful to claimants participating in REAs by helping them identify their needs. The report also states LEAP is useful to REA staff by helping them better refer claimants to much-needed services.

Excerpt from Report for U.S. Department of Labor on LEAP

The IMPAQ International study states the following:

LEAP “assesses individuals in 8 areas: finances; emotional issues; social, family, and health issues; use of time; next career; more education and training; job search; and use of services and resources. Claimants are asked 10 questions in each of these sections gauging their concerns on a variety of topics. Answers range from 1 to 4 for each question, with 1 denoting a minor concern and 4 denoting a major concern. 

“Claimants total their scores on each section and then look to the back of the LEAP form for suggestions on how best to alleviate their concerns in each of the 8 LEAP areas. Use of the LEAP form differs by local office, with some requiring claimants to fill it out during or before the REA interview and others providing it at the end of the interview for claimants to use at home. 

“At the Reno JobConnect, for example, the REA interviewer requires each claimant to fill out the LEAP form before the REA interview, and then reviews the claimant’s scores, to alleviate some of the issues that had been raised while also referring him/her to available services. 

“The LEAP form has been noted by REA staff to be very useful not only in gauging the emotional and financial status of individuals, but also for referring them to much needed services.”

Complete Study Describing LEAP at U.S. Department of Labor Website

The complete IMPAQ report is available for download at the U.S. Department of Labor's WorkforceGPS site.

Follow-Up Study

A follow-up IMPAQ study for the U.S. Department of Labor found Nevada’s REA participants had 3.13 fewer weeks on UI compared to individuals in the control group, saving $873 in benefits payout per REA participant. This amount exceeded REA costs by more than 4 times. 

LEAP and YES Testimonials on Effectiveness and Results

The organizations using LEAP and YES continue to give positive feedback on their effectiveness with job hunters and the unemployed. 

One program administrator said, “We love LEAP. It helps the unemployed think of the many issues they are facing and verbalize what they are worried about. We wouldn’t get to some issues without LEAP because people are overwhelmed by stress. LEAP gives them a tool for moving forward. LEAP also helps our staff. LEAP also works with newly laid off people, because they are not thinking clearly.”

Workforce Development &
Career Services Professionals:

Conducting in-person RESEAs under WIOA? Address UI claimants' specific needs with LEAP.

Learn about Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES).


Career Action Blog

“This Jobs Program Just Might Get People Back to Work” is the title of a recent Pew Trusts article that describes the success and expansion of the U.S. Department of Labor’s RESEA (Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment) program, particularly in Nevada.

The story details how Nevada’s RESEA program has the best results of all the states studied, saving more than four times the RESEA costs and shortening participants' unemployment insurance benefits by approximately three weeks.

Nevada’s RESEA program “significantly reduced the amount of time people received unemployment benefits,” states the Pew Trusts article by staff writer Sophie Quinton.

Nevada uses Career Action Resources assessment guides with its RESEA participants. In particular, our Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) is described in the first RESEA (then called REA) study commissioned by the U.S. Department of Labor as an “innovative self-assessment” that helps claimants identify their needs.

Learning About Your Scores in Step 2 of LEAP, Second Edition.jpgThe USDOL report also states LEAP is useful to workforce staff by helping them better refer claimants to much-needed services. Nevada is now using Your Employment Search (YES) in its RESEA program. Read more about the RESEA research.

Need proven tools to guide UI claimants, job seekers, and staff? Request a complimentary review sample of LEAP and YES.


#wkdev #wioa 
 

Do you have job seekers who can't seem to get hired? They may appear to be doing everything right, but they may actually be passive job hunters, according to the Editors at Career Action Resources. Here are 3 signs that individuals are being passive in their employment search.

  1. Only applying for job after job online. Online job applications are a key way to apply for jobs. But online applications have pitfalls. First, if a person's skills and experience do not match the opening, an application may be automatically rejected. Second, if an individual is applying for many jobs, chances are he or she is not a good fit for all of them. Third, they are missing opportunities to job search in more effective ways, such as networking with people who can connect them to hiring managers. Encourage job hunters to target their search and go beyond online applications.
  2. Not tailoring a cover letter and resume to each job. Using the same cover letter and resume for each job is easy; it is also passive. Instead, ask job seekers to take some time match their materials to the job opening. It may help to emphasize qualifications that especially fit the opening. This approach makes it easier for employers to see how an applicant meets their needs.
  3. Spending just a few hours a week on their job search. Suggest that job seekers create a schedule of job search activities, including applying for jobs, networking, researching and contacting employers, and practicing interview skills.

Your Employment Search [Career Action Blog]The good news is, all job hunters can become more active in the search for employment. With an active job hunt, they'll be more likely to get hired quickly in the right job.

Need help explaining to your job seekers how an active employment search works? Consider using Your Employment Search (YES). a best-practice tool for tailored job search guidance, in your career centers. Workforce development professionals can request a complimentary review sample of YES from Career Action Resources, LLC.

 

 

Job seekers have more skills than they may realize. A new online tool from the U.S. Department of Labor lets job hunters rate themselves on 40 workplace skills and then learn their best-fit career options.

Called the “Skills Matcher,” the tool gives individuals immediate results to 

  • Increase their skills awareness and skills language.
  • Find careers that interest them and suit their skills.
  • Explore careers they hadn’t considered.
  • Plan their career and training paths.
  • Learn the wages, education, and outlook for careers that match their skills.
  • Target a job search.
  • Explain to employers how their skills match a job.
  • Enhance a cover letter, resume, and online profile with skills language.

In the Skills Matcher, job seekers rate their level of each skill as beginner, basic, skilled, advanced, and expert. It includes examples of each skill to help with the ranking.

The Skills Matcher compares a person’s skill rating to the knowledge, skills, and abilities of more than 900 O*NET occupations. Try out the Skills Matcher, available on the CareerOneStop site.