Best Practices / Reemployment Results

  • Career Action Resources’ Material: Innovative Best Practice in Nation’s Most-Effective Reemployment Program

  • Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner Is ONLY Tool Described in U.S. Department of Labor Study on Reemployment Program Success

 

Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES) are helping thousands of job hunters across the USA to assess their needs and to create job search and reemployment plans.

In research for the U.S. Department of Labor, our material is identified as an innovative best practice for reemployment.

Specifically, the study explains how LEAP is used to assess unemployment insurance (UI) claimants in the nation’s most-effective reemployment program. LEAP is the only self-assessment described by researchers in the report!

Learn more about the study below.

Good-bye, UI

IMPAQ International researched the effectiveness of the U.S. Department of Labor’s Reemployment and Eligibility Assessment (REA) initiative. Note: The initiative is now called the Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) program; its name was changed with the implementation of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).

Among the best practices for reemployment, the study recommends “rigorous assessment forms to identify barriers to employment....Perhaps the most innovative self-assessment form is the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP), which is used in Nevada.”

The research found Nevada has the most effective REA program of the states studied. The study explains LEAP is useful to claimants participating in REAs by helping them identify their needs. The report also states LEAP is useful to REA staff by helping them better refer claimants to much-needed services.

Excerpt from Report for U.S. Department of Labor on LEAP

The IMPAQ International study states the following:

LEAP “assesses individuals in 8 areas: finances; emotional issues; social, family, and health issues; use of time; next career; more education and training; job search; and use of services and resources. Claimants are asked 10 questions in each of these sections gauging their concerns on a variety of topics. Answers range from 1 to 4 for each question, with 1 denoting a minor concern and 4 denoting a major concern. 

“Claimants total their scores on each section and then look to the back of the LEAP form for suggestions on how best to alleviate their concerns in each of the 8 LEAP areas. Use of the LEAP form differs by local office, with some requiring claimants to fill it out during or before the REA interview and others providing it at the end of the interview for claimants to use at home. 

“At the Reno JobConnect, for example, the REA interviewer requires each claimant to fill out the LEAP form before the REA interview, and then reviews the claimant’s scores, to alleviate some of the issues that had been raised while also referring him/her to available services. 

“The LEAP form has been noted by REA staff to be very useful not only in gauging the emotional and financial status of individuals, but also for referring them to much needed services.”

Complete Study Describing LEAP at U.S. Department of Labor Website

The complete IMPAQ report is available for download at the U.S. Department of Labor's WorkforceGPS site.

Follow-Up Study

A follow-up IMPAQ study for the U.S. Department of Labor found Nevada’s REA participants had 3.13 fewer weeks on UI compared to individuals in the control group, saving $873 in benefits payout per REA participant. This amount exceeded REA costs by more than 4 times. 

LEAP and YES Testimonials on Effectiveness and Results

The organizations using LEAP and YES continue to give positive feedback on their effectiveness with job hunters and the unemployed. 

One program administrator said, “We love LEAP. It helps the unemployed think of the many issues they are facing and verbalize what they are worried about. We wouldn’t get to some issues without LEAP because people are overwhelmed by stress. LEAP gives them a tool for moving forward. LEAP also helps our staff. LEAP also works with newly laid off people, because they are not thinking clearly.”

Workforce Development &
Career Services Professionals:

Conducting in-person RESEAs under WIOA? Address UI claimants' specific needs with LEAP.

Learn about Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES).


Career Action Blog

Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) helps dislocated workers and unemployment insurance (UI) claimants take a leap forward in coping with a layoff and beginning a job search. With LEAP, the unemployed rank their key needs after a losing a job, get guidance and encouragement on their biggest concerns, and create a reemployment action plan under WIOA.

But that’s not all. Here are five points that you may not know about LEAP.

  1. LEAP Used in RESEA Programs. States are using LEAP in their Reemployment Services and Eligibility Assessment (RESEA) programs. A goal of the U.S. Department of Labor RESEA initiative is to connect with UI claimants by requiring them to create reemployment plans that include work search activities and American Job Center orientation/referrals. According the USDOL, identifying UI claimant’s needs and referring them to reemployment services have been proven effective. One study for the USDOL states that RESEAs are an effective strategy to speed reemployment of unemployed workers, reduce overpayments, and realize cost savings for the UI trust fund. LEAP can play an important role in the RESEA process by identifying UI claimants’ key needs and barriers, giving them useful information on careers and the job search process, referring them to American Job Center services, and guiding them in creating a personalized/tailored reemployment plan. According to an IMPAQ International report for the USDOL, LEAP is “innovative” and “assesses individuals in eight areas… Claimants total their scores in each section and then look to the back of LEAP for suggestions on how best to alleviate their concerns.” A second IMPAQ study reports that one state’s RESEA claimants had 3.13 fewer weeks of total UI duration compared to individuals in the control group, saving $873 in benefits payout per treatment group member. This amount exceeded RESEA costs by more than four times.
  2. LEAP Underwent Intense Development and Review. LEAP underwent intense development and review, and its creators at Career Action Resources adhered to strict developmental guidelines. The editors at Career Action Resources, who have 20 years of experience in the job search and career field, began reviewing the vast literature and research on the needs of dislocated workers. They created a draft version of LEAP using this information. After a draft version of LEAP was written, dislocated workers and workforce development professionals reviewed the text and completed a questionnaire on the items, scales, ease of use, and other details. After this review period, additional changes were made to the draft, including adding an education/training scale and other information. A professionally designed prototype of the six-panel foldout was reviewed by other workforce professionals, and additional changes were suggested and made. Positive reactions to LEAP during these stages encouraged the editors at Career Action Resources to continue its development. LEAP was printed and then pilot-tested with laid-off manufacturing workers. Other dislocated workers and workforce development staff received copies of LEAP for review. A similar process occurred for LEAP’s Second Edition. Career Action Resources continue to seek feedback from LEAP customers. Feedback on the usefulness of LEAP was and continues to be gratifyingly positive.
  3. LEAP Is Easy to Administer, Score, and Interpret. Because workforce development professionals are time-strapped, and because dislocated workers need to obtain services as soon as possible, LEAP had to be quick and not burdensome. The editors at Career Action Resources designed LEAP to be taken and to provide results in about a half-hour total. LEAP is completely self-administered, self-scoring, and self-interpreting, so workforce development professionals do not need special training to use LEAP with dislocated workers. LEAP can simply be handed out, or it can be used for an orientation meeting, Rapid Response session, RESEA meeting, workshop, or job club session, for example. Although no special training is required to administer LEAP, the LEAP Administrator’s Guide gives detailed background and guidance information.
  4. LEAP Offers Guidance Based on Individual Needs Under WIOA. LEAP gives workforce development professionals a unique way to interact and counsel job seekers and help them create unique employment plans based on their needs, as directed by WIOA. LEAP answers the key question of “What do I do now?” by helping laid-off workers discover their top problems and by providing suggestions for action. Although laid-off individuals have lost their jobs through no fault of their own, their problems vary depending on many factors, such as their financial situation, age, attitude, marketable skills, work history, education, knowledge of growing careers, knowledge of the job search process, and support systems, just to name some. A workforce professional who reviewed LEAP commented that dislocated workers are often overwhelmed by their situation but in different ways. Thus, the one-size-fits-all information that laid-off workers may have received in the past will not suit their needs completely or may not address certain personal issues and barriers. For example, if an individual is encouraged to start a job search but hasn’t defined her next career choice, she may flounder and quickly get frustrated. Or if a person can’t seem to take action on networking or writing a resume, he may need to acknowledge his lingering shock or the importance of managing his time by creating a job search schedule. As the anxieties after job loss mount, the newly unemployed may have difficulty sorting through their questions, options, choices, and fears. Creating an action plan for their next steps may be overwhelming. The situation may cause delays in seeking help and in being proactive on job search, financial, and personal fronts. LEAP provides laid-off workers with a vast amount of eye-opening information in a quick, easy-to-read format and pinpoints the reemployment help and other resources that each individual needs most.
  5. LEAP Includes Complimentary LEAP Administrator’s Guide. Career Action Resources offers a helpful LEAP Administrator’s Guide in PDF to LEAP purchasers. The guide gives details on LEAP’s development, scales, uses, administration, and much more.

Qualified workforce and career professionals can request a complimentary LEAP review sample. Request your LEAP sample now.

The 2018-2019 Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) continues its long tradition as the go-to resource for job seekers, career changers, students, and anyone seeking reliable career information for decision making and planning. The OOH is free and is financed by U.S taxpayers through the U.S. Department of Labor. 

Now entirely online, the OOH includes information about 575 detailed occupations in 325 occupational profiles, covering about 4 out of 5 jobs in our economy. Each profile features new U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)  projections, along with details on the job outlook, work activities, wages, education and training requirements, and more. In addition, the wage information in the OOH is now updated annually. 

Select profiles in the OOH include career videos produced by U.S. Department of Labor’s CareerOneStop. Links to videos appear on the Summary tab of profiles to the right of the Quick Facts box. 

Take a few minutes to become familiar with the OOH, and then be sure to share its wealth of facts and insights with job seekers and others you assist and serve.

Navigating the OOH Homepage

There are several ways to find career information about a detailed occupation:

  • Occupation Group Search. The OOH is broken into clusters of similar occupations. To find an occupation, browse the occupational group of interest on the left side of the homepage. Clicking on a group results in a landing page of similar occupations together with their respective job summaries, typical entry-level education, and median pay. Typical entry-level education and median pay can be sorted by clicking the arrows at the top of each column.
  • Occupation Finder. The occupation finder (located toward the top of the homepage) makes it easy to search for occupations by entry-level education, on-the-job training requirements, projected number of new jobs, projected employment growth rate, median pay, or a combination of these characteristics. 
  • Search Box. You may also search for occupations by entering a title into the “Search Handbook” box at the top right side of the homepage.
  • A–Z Index Search. You may use the alphabetical index to look for an occupation. 
  • Browse Occupations. Clicking on these buttons takes you to three distinct pages: highest paying occupations, occupations projected to be the fastest growing, and occupations projected to have the most new jobs created.
  • Featured Occupation. With each visit to the OOH homepage, a different occupation will be featured to click on and explore.
  • Question Mark (?). Certain terms in the profiles have question marks next to them. You can click on the question mark to read the definition of a term or about the section.

How OOH Profiles Are Organized

Each occupational profile in the OOH is made up of nine tabs, as follows.

1. Summary Page

Quick-facts table; this feature summarizes key information about the occupation, including the following:

  • Median pay
  • Entry-level education
  • Work experience in a related occupation
  • On-the-job training
  • Number of jobs 
  • Job outlook
  • Employment change

2. What They Do

  • Definition of the occupation
  • Typical duties
  • Specialties within the occupation

3. Work Environment

  • Number of jobs 
  • Work setting, including potential hazards and physical, emotional, or mental demands
  • Employment by largest industries
  • Work schedules, including information on hours worked and seasonality of work
  • Injuries and illnesses (if relevant)

4. How to Become One

  • Typical entry-level education requirements
  • Important qualities that are helpful in performing the work
  • Typical on-the-job training needed to attain competency in the occupation (if relevant)
  • Licenses, certifications, and registrations (if relevant)
  • Work experience in a related occupation (if relevant)
  • Other experience (if relevant)
  • Advancement (if relevant)

5. Pay

  • Median annual or hourly wages: top 10 percent in wages earned, bottom 10 percent in wages earned, and wages earned in top-employing industries
  • Chart showing median annual or hourly wages in the occupation in comparison with median annual or hourly wage for all occupations
  • Work schedules
  • Union membership (if relevant)

6. Job Outlook

  • Projected change in level and percentage of employment, including a discussion of the following factors affecting occupational employment change: industry growth or decline, technological change, demand for a product or service, demographic change, change in business patterns
  • Chart showing projected rate of employment growth in the occupation in comparison with the projected rate of growth for all occupations
  • Job prospects, including expected level of competition and factors that may improve job prospects
  • Table showing employment projections data for the occupations covered in a profile, with a link to a spreadsheet that details employment by industry for those occupations

7. State and Area Data

  • Links to sources for employment, wages, and projections data by state and area

8. Similar Occupations

  • List of similar occupations, with summaries of their job duties, typical education level needed to enter the occupation, and median pay
  • Similar occupations are selected on the basis of similar work performed and, in some cases, on the basis of the skills, education, and/or training needed to perform the work

9. More Info

  • List of associations, organizations, and government agencies that provide career information for specific occupations
  • Links to O*NET, which provides comprehensive information on key characteristics of workers and occupations

"With the OOH, you and your job hunters can learn valuable occupational information to make career and education choices and changes," state the career editor-experts at Career Action Resources, creator of Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES), which are employment / reemployment guides used in workforce programs across the nation.

"By familiarizing yourself with the features of the OOH, you will be in a position to quickly and effectively help those you serve with important job and career decisions and direction," the Career Action Resources editors said. 


Employment is projected to increase by 11.5 million over the next decade, an increase from 156.1 million to 167.6 million, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports. The new projections are the foundation of the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH), one of the nation’s most widely used career information resources.

The updated OOH is now available online. In the past, several months would elapse between the projections' data release and the OOH's physical publication. With the online OOH publication, the delay no longer exists.

Per the projections, health-care industries and their associated occupations are expected to account for a large share of new jobs projected through 2026, as the aging population continues to drive demand for health-care services.

The labor force will continue to grow slowly and to become older and more diverse. The aging population is projected to result in a decline in the overall labor force participation rate over the 2016 to 2026 decade.