Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner LEAP

LAYOFF-TO-EMPLOYMENT ACTION PLANNER (LEAP)

Now in its Second Edition, the best-selling LEAP helps dislocated workers and UI claimants rank and cope with key issues faced after a layoff and develop a reemployment plan.

  • 3 steps
  • Assesses job search and life barriers in 8 critical areas
  • Guides workers in creating a reemployment action plan tailored to their needs

 

Your Employment Search YES

YOUR
EMPLOYMENT SEARCH
(YES)

YES measures and transforms job-search readiness and effectiveness. No matter where job hunters are in their work search, YES leads to a ready-to-use job-search strategy.

  • 3 steps, plus an employment search strategy summary
  • Teaches proven job-seeking skills in 5 key areas
  • Guidance for developing a personal employment search strategy


 

Career Action Resources: Creators of Self-Assessments Used in Workforce Development, Employment Programs, & Career Services

Career Action Resources LLC is the creator of the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES). LEAP and YES are best-practice self-assessments that guide job hunters and the unemployed in job search and reemployment planning.

LEAP and YES are helping thousands of job seekers across the nation in workforce agencies, employment programs, and career centers.

 

Career Action Blog

In the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) rules, "customers" are mentioned 143 times. This emphasis is driving the "customer-centered design" initiative for WIOA implementation. Also called human-centered design, the effort is being led by the U.S. Department of Labor to inspire the workforce system to invigorate service delivery under WIOA.

Customers Mentioned 143 Times in WIOA [Career Action Blog]

Key tenets of customer-centered design include the following:

  • Start with "how might we" questions to inspire the process.
  • Observe and empathize with customers.
  • Be open-minded about how things are done and what customers need.
  • Try new approaches and learn from them.
  • Seek to improve the customer experience. 

Seeking tools that put job seekers at the center of your service delivery? Looking for ways to improve your interaction with job hunters and other customers?

Consider Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES), which help staff interact with customers and create job search and employment plans based on each individual's unique needs. Both LEAP and YES are published by Career Action Resources, LLC.


#WIOA  #wkdev #jobs

The following information comes directly from “WIOA Fact Sheet: Detailed Overview of All Final Rules,” the third in a series of fact sheets from the U.S. Department of Labor on the WIOA Final Regulations.

 

WIOA Implementation

Detailed Look Fact Sheet at WIOA Final Rules

The bipartisan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014, created a new vision for how America prepares an educated and skilled workforce that expands opportunity for workers and employers. The 21st century public workforce development system created through WIOA builds closer ties between business leaders, state and local workforce development boards, labor unions, community colleges, non-profit organizations, youth-serving organizations, and State and local officials to deliver a more job-driven approach to training and skills development. The final regulations are the result of unprecedented collaboration between the Departments of Education and Labor (departments) and are the latest milestone in WIOA implementation. Since WIOA was signed, the departments engaged the public workforce system through guidance, the submission of state strategic plans, and specifications for new performance data reporting. These final regulations provide the foundation upon which services to individuals and businesses can be strengthened and improved over time.

WIOA in Partnership

In keeping with WIOA’s focus on delivering integrated, coordinated services, these final regulations were developed in partnership with multiple federal agencies. These agencies will continue to collaborate to train state and local partners in strengthening career pathways, work-based learning, sector strategies, and business engagement, and also in delivering effective services to all individuals, including individuals with barriers to employment.

Key Provisions of the Joint Final Rule

The Joint Final Rule structurally aligns the six WIOA core programs (Adult, Dislocated Worker, Youth, Employment Service, Adult Education, and Vocational Rehabilitation), thus supporting cross-program strategic and operational planning, performance accountability, and requirements for administering and operating the American Job Center system.

  • Coordinated Planning: The development and submission of a Unified or Combined State Plan reinforces a state’s role in formulating a strategic vision to align its federal resources. WIOA requires the core programs to develop a single Unified State Plan. The final regulations also elaborate on each state’s option to submit a Combined State Plan instead that reflects planning by the core programs with other workforce system partners.
  • Aligning Accountability: The joint final regulations implement a number of provisions designed to improve accountability and transparency within the workforce system, and measure key employment and educational outcomes, as well as the programs’ effectiveness in meeting employers’ needs. Specifically, the joint final regulations require the six core programs to report participant outcomes using six common performance indicators:
  1. The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program.
  2. The percentage of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the fourth quarter after exit from the program.
  3. The median earnings of program participants who are in unsubsidized employment during the second quarter after exit from the program.
  4. The percentage of program participants who obtained a recognized postsecondary credential, or a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent during participation in or within one year after exit from the program (participants who obtained a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent are included in the percentage only if they have obtained or retained employment or are in an education or training program leading to a recognized postsecondary credential within one year after exit from the program).
  5. The percentage of program participants who, during a program year, are in an education or training program that leads to a recognized postsecondary credential or employment and who are achieving measurable skill gains toward such a credential or employment.
  6. The indicator(s) of effectiveness in serving employers.

In addition, other workforce programs will use this common data reporting structure, thereby aligning data elements and definitions across more programs. The joint final regulations also require: (1) the use of a statistical adjustment model to set levels of performance; (2) state submission of an annual report using a standard format; and (3) the publication of easy-to-understand information about the performance of training providers and programs.

  • Improving Service Delivery: WIOA provides enhancements for a more integrated and coordinated one-stop service delivery system in each state, and brands this system as the American Job Center system. The Joint Final Rule describes this system of services including roles and responsibilities for the six core programs, as well as other partner programs such as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families; programmatic and physical accessibility for all customers; Memoranda of Understanding requirements; infrastructure funding; and one-stop certification.

Key Provisions of the Title I Adult, Dislocated Worker, Youth, National Programs, and Job Corps, and Title III Employment Service Programs

This Final Rule provides the framework for state and local workforce development systems to provide services that increase the employment, retention, earnings, and occupational skill attainment of U.S. workers. The rule includes provisions to help out-of-school youth, individuals with disabilities, and others with barriers to employment move into good jobs and careers; and to give businesses the skilled workforce needed to make the United States more competitive in the 21st Century global economy. Key features of the rule include 

  • Integrated services to job seekers and businesses: Businesses and job seekers will have access to a seamless system of high-quality education, employment, and training services through one of the nearly 2,500 American Job Centers across the country. Under the regulation, coordination of programs, services, and governance structures will support both individuals seeking jobs and skills training and employers seeking skilled workers.
  • Increased access to relevant training: The regulation increases access to job-driven training, informed by using labor market information and employer needs identified through business engagement. The regulation will encourage the use of work-based learning strategies, such as on-the job training and registered apprenticeships. Programs deliver training along career pathways, accompanied by career counseling, supportive services, and needs-related payments, as appropriate.
  • Wider array of services for youth: Youth, especially out-of-school and at-risk youth, are connected through American Job Centers to education and jobs; particularly work experience, career guidance, financial literacy education, and entrepreneurial skills training. The rules continue to support YouthBuild, which funds job training and educational activities for at-risk youth who, as part of their training, help construct or rehabilitate housing for homeless individuals and families and low-income families. The Job Corps program is also strengthened, with specific requirements relating to site selection, protection, and maintenance of Job Corps facilities; funding and selection of center operators and service providers; recruitment, eligibility, screening, selection and assignment, and enrollment of Job Corps students; Job Corps program activities and center operations; student support; and career transition services and graduate services.
  • Improved services for business: The new rule better aligns services with the needs of regional economies and local employers by instituting regional planning and enabling boards to use industry or sector partnerships that include high-quality worker training for new and incumbent workers that meet the needs of local and regional employers.
  • Greater emphasis on reemployment: The regulations allow the workforce system to more effectively respond when workers lose their jobs by integrating Unemployment Insurance, rapid response to worker dislocations, and customer-centered National Dislocated Worker Grants that enable quick applications for grants to relieve the impact of mass layoffs and other major economic dislocations, emergencies, and disasters on employment in the impacted area and to meet the training and reemployment needs of affected workers. The rule also further aligns employment services to the rest of the public workforce system, by mandating colocation of employment service offices with American Job Centers and emphasizes reemployment services for unemployment insurance claimants such as skill assessments and job search assistance.
  • Better information means better decision-making: Boards will use up-to-date labor market information, program evaluations, and related data to inform customers as they are considering program options, inform lawmakers updating public policy, and drive strategic decision making for program operators.
  • Streamlined Indian and Native American Program: The regulations require that Indian and Native American Program grants be awarded through a competitive process that aligns with other WIOA-funded programs. Grantees are also required to submit a 4-year plan which describes their service strategies and program operations.
  • Improved services and protections for farmworkers: The regulations provide migrant and seasonal farmworkers with career services and training, housing assistance, youth services, and related assistance. Under the regulations, more services are available to a wider age range of migrant youth. The regulations also govern the Agricultural Recruitment System, a system for interstate and intrastate agricultural job recruitment, and provide agricultural housing standards for migrant and seasonal farmworkers.

Key Provisions of the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act Program

WIOA strengthens the Title II Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) program by positioning adult education services as a key component of the workforce development system in local communities and improving alignment among adult education programs, postsecondary education providers, and employers. The program-specific Final Rule adheres to the following key goals:

  • Transition from adult basic education to postsecondary education, postsecondary training, or employment: While AEFLA continues to emphasize high school completion for youth and adults, WIOA reauthorized AEFLA in a manner that recognizes that completion of high school is not an end in itself but a means to further opportunities and greater economic self-sufficiency. Through the implementation of new activities such as integrated education and training, workforce preparation activities, and career pathways programming, changes that will be implemented under the AEFLA Final Rule will better support individuals as they transition from adult basic education to postsecondary education, postsecondary training, or employment.
  • English language learning: Through WIOA, AEFLA now formalizes the role that adult education has played for decades related to assisting immigrants and English language learners in learning to read, write, and speak English, adds mathematics to the scope of services, and expands the focus of English language learning by adding civics education and workforce training.
  • Innovative supports for re-entry: Drawing on growing research on the long-term value of education in reducing recidivism and promoting successful re-entry into society, AEFLA, as reauthorized by WIOA, encourages investments in and innovative programming for the educational and career advancement of incarcerated individuals.
  • Supports for families and communities: As reauthorized by WIOA, the purpose of AEFLA continues to emphasize the important role that adult education and literacy plays in supporting the educational and skill achievement of parents and family members to participate in the educational development of their children and improve economic opportunities for their families.

Key Provisions of the Title IV Vocational Rehabilitation Program

WIOA makes significant changes to programs authorized under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Title IV), particularly to the Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program. This is one of the core programs administered by the Department of Education, providing VR services to individuals with disabilities, including students and youth with disabilities. The program-specific Final Rule adheres to the following key goals:

  • Aligns the VR program with other core programs: WIOA strengthens the alignment of the VR program with other core programs of the workforce development system. This alignment also brings together various entities in workforce, educational and human resource programs to create a seamless customer-focused service delivery network that integrates service delivery across programs, enhances access to services, and improves long-term employment outcomes for individuals with disabilities.
  • Strengthens the VR program’s focus on competitive integrated employment: The guiding principle of the VR program is that individuals with disabilities, including those with the most significant disabilities, are capable of achieving high quality, competitive integrated employment when provided the necessary services and supports. To increase the employment of individuals with disabilities in the competitive integrated labor market, the workforce system must provide individuals with disabilities opportunities to participate in job-driven training and pursue high quality employment outcomes. The VR program enhances access to services, including VR services, for individuals with disabilities seeking or continuing employment at subminimum wages with entities holding special wage certificates under section 14(c) of the Fair Labor Standards Act, enabling them to achieve competitive integrated employment.
  • Expands VR services to students and youth with disabilities: WIOA ensures that students and youth with disabilities have meaningful opportunities to receive the VR services they need to achieve competitive integrated employment. WIOA amends the VR program to expand not only the population of students with disabilities who may receive VR services but also the breadth of services that the VR agencies may provide to youth and students with disabilities who are transitioning from school to postsecondary education and employment. Under WIOA, the VR program strengthens coordination between VR agencies and local education agencies in the provision of transition services provided under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act and the provision of pre-employment transition services to students with disabilities under the VR program.

See the complete "WIOA Fact Sheet: Detailed Overview of All Final Rules,"  the other WIOA fact sheets, and links to the final WIOA rules.

#wkdev #jobs #WIOA


 

The following information appears on a fact sheet released by the U.S. Department of Labor on the WIOA Final Regulations. The fact sheet gives a "quick overview" of how the WIOA Final Rules will reform more than a dozen programs that receive $10 billion in funding annually and that serve 20 million Americans every year.

WIOA Final Regulations Fact Sheet [Career Action Blog]

The bipartisan Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) (Pub. L. 113-128), signed by President Obama on July 22, 2014, created a new vision for how America prepares an educated and skilled workforce that expands opportunity for workers and employers. WIOA represents the most significant reform to our public workforce development system in nearly 20 years. The same day the President signed WIOA into law, the Vice President released his Job-Driven Training report, recommending improvements to our federal training programs, including stronger employer engagement, the use of work-based learning approaches like apprenticeship, accountability for employment outcomes, and regional partnerships. The Administration laid out a vision for our job training system that—as he explained—“trains our workers first based on what employers are telling us they’re hiring for and helps business design the training programs so that we’re creating a pipeline into jobs that are actually out there.” Many of these recommendations complement the new law.

The 21st century public workforce development system created through WIOA builds closer ties between business leaders, state and local Workforce Development Boards, labor unions, community colleges, non-profit organizations, youth-serving organizations, and state and local officials to deliver a more job-driven approach to training and skills development. The system will deliver integrated, job-driven services to job seekers, including youth and those with barriers to employment, as well as to workers and employers. It supports the development of strong regional economies and enhances performance accountability to better inform consumers and investors about programs and services that work.

The WIOA Final Rules include reforms that will affect more than a dozen programs receiving approximately $10 billion in annual funding, and programs that serve approximately 20 million Americans each year, by

  • Ensuring Accountability for Employment Results. All programs will now report employment and earning outcomes, which is new for some programs, and all core programs will report on outcomes using the same definitions so that their results can more easily be compared.
  • Improving Transparency for Job Seekers to Help Them Make Better Choices. Customers will also have information to better inform their choices when selecting training programs. American workers looking to invest time and money in training can go online and see which programs have the best chance at giving them a leg up.
  • Strengthening Employer Engagement and Service to Businesses. We are implementing a new accountability indicator to gauge how effectively businesses are served by the workforce system. The law also will increase opportunities for work-based learning, including on-the-job training and Registered Apprenticeships, for all Americans, particularly those with barriers to employment.
  • Enhancing Coordination and Collaboration Across Programs. We are implementing provisions of the law that require unified state planning across programs and co-location of more programs in American Job Centers. These reforms will result in streamlined access to customer-focused services and improved communication across the workforce system.

The U.S. Departments of Labor and Education (Departments) made available to the public a set of final regulations implementing WIOA. In developing these final regulations the Departments consulted with stakeholders, published proposed rules, and reviewed thousands of pages of public comments received in response to those proposed rules. The final regulations encourage customer-centered, job-driven strategies, such as career pathways, business engagement systems, sector strategies, and work-based learning; and they emphasize a commitment to high-quality services for all populations, including individuals with barriers to employment. These regulations provide the foundation upon which services to individuals and businesses can be strengthened and improved over time and include

I. Joint Rule for Unified and Combined State Plans, Performance Accountability, and the One-Stop System Joint Provisions: This Joint Final Rule, issued by the Departments of Education and Labor, implements jointly administered activities authorized by Title I of WIOA. This Joint Final Rule provides guidance for state and local workforce development systems on the requirements governing the development and submission of Unified and Combined State Plans, the performance accountability system, and the joint one-stop system, particularly with respect to partner program responsibilities, programmatic and physical accessibility for all customers, memoranda of understanding, infrastructure funding, and one-stop certification. This Joint WIOA Final Rule reflects changes made as a result of public comments received on the joint Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that was published on April 16, 2015, at 80FR 20574.

II. Department of Labor Only: This Department of Labor Final Rule implements Titles I and III of WIOA. The Department prepared this Final Rule to implement those provisions of WIOA that affect the core programs under Title I; the Wagner-Peyser Act Employment Service and Monitor Advocate system as amended by WIOA Title III; and the Job Corps and national programs authorized under Title I which will be administered by the Department. This Final Rule reflects changes made as a result of public comments received to the NPRM that was published on April 16, 2015, at 80 FR 20690.

III. Programs and Activities Authorized by the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (Title II of WIOA): This Department of Education Final Rule implements changes to the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act (AEFLA) resulting from the enactment of WIOA. This Final Rule clarifies new provisions in the law and updates the regulations that establish criteria for determining the suitability of tests used for measuring state performance on the measurable skill gains indicator under WIOA. Finally, the rule removes specific parts of title 34 of the Code of Federal Regulations that are no longer in effect. This Final Rule reflects changes made as a result of public comments received on the NPRM that was published on April 16, 2015, at 80FR 20968.

IV. State Vocational Rehabilitation Services Program; State Supported Employment Services Program; Limitations on Use of Subminimum Wage: This Department of Education Final Rule amends the regulations governing the State Vocational Rehabilitation Services program and the State Supported Employment Services program in order to implement changes to the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (Rehabilitation Act), as amended by Title IV of WIOA. This Final Rule also updates, clarifies, and improves the current regulations. The Department of Education also produced new regulations regarding limitations on the use of subminimum wages added by new Section 511 of the Rehabilitation Act, which are under the purview of the Department of Education. This Final Rule reflects changes made as a result of public comments received on the NPRM that was published on April 16, 2015, at 80 FR 21059.

V. WIOA, Miscellaneous Program Changes: This Department of Education Final Rule amends the regulations governing a number of other programs administered by the Rehabilitation Services Administration to implement changes to the Rehabilitation Act made by WIOA. This Rule also implements those changes to the Rehabilitation Act made by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, enacted on August 7, 1998, which had not previously been implemented in regulations, and it otherwise updates, clarifies, and improves the Rehabilitation Services Administration’s current regulations. This Final Rule reflects changes made as a result of public comments received on the NPRM that was published on April 16, 2015, at 80FR 20988.

The Departments of Labor, Education, and Health and Human Services continue to work together to support the public workforce development system to implement WIOA with program and performance data guidance, and training and technical assistance on shared strategies and technical requirements for creating a customer-centered workforce system. 

See the complete "WIOA Fact Sheet: Quick Overview of All Final Rules,"  other WIOA fact sheets, and links to the final WIOA rules.

#wkdev #jobs #WIOA

Testimonial
“We love LEAP. It helps the unemployed think of the many issues they are facing and verbalize what they are worried about. We wouldn’t get to some issues without LEAP because people are overwhelmed by stress. LEAP gives the unemployed a tool for moving forward.”
Workforce Program Administrator

“Shows job seekers where to begin and what priorities to focus on…makes the job search more productive.”
Diana Aughe, Career Coach



"LEAP showed me “where my needs are and where to get help.”
Dislocated Worker in Indiana