Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner LEAP

LAYOFF-TO-EMPLOYMENT ACTION PLANNER (LEAP)

Now in its Second Edition, the best-selling LEAP helps dislocated workers and UI claimants rank and cope with key issues faced after a layoff and develop a reemployment plan.

  • 3 steps
  • Assesses job search and life barriers in 8 critical areas
  • Guides workers in creating a reemployment action plan tailored to their needs

 

Your Employment Search YES

YOUR
 EMPLOYMENT SEARCH
 (YES)

YES measures and transforms job-search readiness and effectiveness. No matter where job hunters are in their work search, YES leads to a ready-to-use job-search strategy.

  • 3 steps, plus an employment search strategy summary
  • Teaches proven job-seeking skills in 5 key areas
  • Guidance for developing a personal employment search strategy


 

Career Action Resources: Creators of Planners Used in Workforce Development, Employment Programs, & Career Services

Career Action Resources LLC is the creator of the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES). LEAP and YES are best-practice tools that guide job hunters and the unemployed in job search and reemployment planning.

LEAP and YES are helping thousands of job seekers across the nation in workforce agencies, employment programs, and career centers.

 

Career Action Blog

As the Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH) marks its 70th birthday in 2019, the Editors at Career Action Resources have assembled this brief look back at its origins and history using information from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) website.

OOH 2006-2007
The cover of the 2006-07 OOH, as published by the U.S. Department of Labor.

The first version of the handbook, called “Occupational Outlook Information,” was issued in August 1946. It was prepared at the request and under the financial support of the Veterans Administration to make information available to returning World War II veterans about the need for general education and for trained personnel in various occupations. 

In answer to many requests, an Occupational Outlook Handbook was then published in spring 1949 and sold to the public. Subsequent editions of the Handbook were published in 1951, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1963, and biennially in even-numbered years starting in 1966. 

The BLS assembled and wrote the OOH, which became a very big book and a nationally recognized, respected source of career information. With each edition, the BLS updated the 10-year employment projections for hundreds of occupations and made many updates and changes to the in-depth occupational descriptions, plus added new jobs, as the economy changed.

For 2010-11, the BLS published the final OOH print edition. At that point, the OOH went solely online, although some publishers continued to offer printed versions for sale to bookstores, workforce programs, libraries, schools, and other customers.

To this day, the OOH continues to provide comprehensive, up-to-date, and reliable labor market information and descriptions for our economy’s jobs, always with an eye toward the future. It gives essential facts and figures about prospective changes in the world of work and the skills and qualifications that will be needed by tomorrow’s workforce. The OOH has helped millions of Americans plan their education and work lives.

Happy 70th Birthday, OOH!


 

 

The U.S. Department of Labor has launched a new effort to reduce improper Unemployment Insurance (UI) payments across the nation.

ui map

"Providing states with resources to recognize and combat improper Unemployment Insurance payments is a critical piece of our federal-state partnership," U.S. Secretary of Labor Alexander Acosta said, according to a USDOL news release. "I have contacted governors across the nation and asked them to recommit to lowering the UI improper payment rate in their state. The Department stands ready to help states with high level of improper payments by providing targeted assistance."

In addition, the USDOL has published a redesigned "Unemployment Insurance Payment Accuracy by State" webpage that show each state's improper UI payment rate. The page offers information on each state's root causes of improper payments and other data.

Need help guiding UI claimants and the unemployed to employment? Workforce development professionals: Request a complimentary review sample of Your Employment Search (YES).

 

How do your job seekers find job openings? If they are searching the big online job sites only, they may be leaving many job possibilities on the table. It is important for job hunters to let people know they are job searching, to ask for job leads, and to look for opportunities beyond traditional job search channels.

Job seekers may find job leads and openings through the following:tips.jpg

  1. Local American Job Center
  2. Employers of interest, even if no jobs are advertised
  3. Companies running numerous help-wanted ads (they’re hiring)
  4. Family, friends, and neighbors
  5. Alumni association and career services at their school or college
  6. Professional groups and events
  7. Colleagues and former co-workers 
  8. Past classmates and teachers 
  9. Hobbies, clubs, and sports
  10. People at their place of worship 
  11. People they know through their children and their spouse/significant other
  12. People with whom they do volunteer work and community service 
  13. People who provide services, such as their dentist, accountant, and insurance agent
  14. People they've helped in the past 
  15. Recruiters and employment agencies 
  16. Job fairs and hiring events
  17. News articles about growing companies
  18. Business journals and specialty publications and job sites for their field and related industries 
  19. LinkedIn and other social media
  20. Freelancing, part-time work, and consulting work

The more doors your job seekers knock on, the more likely it is they will find a job soon. 

Need help guiding job hunters to employment or reemployment? Workforce development professionals: Request a complimentary review sample of Your Employment Search (YES).
 

Testimonial
"LEAP showed me “where my needs are and where to get help.”
Dislocated Worker in Indiana

“Shows job seekers where to begin and what priorities to focus on…makes the job search more productive.”
Diana Aughe, Career Coach