Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner LEAP

LAYOFF-TO-EMPLOYMENT ACTION PLANNER (LEAP)

Now in its Second Edition, the best-selling LEAP helps dislocated workers and UI claimants rank and cope with key issues faced after a layoff and develop a reemployment plan.

  • 3 steps
  • Assesses job search and life barriers in 8 critical areas
  • Guides workers in creating a reemployment action plan tailored to their needs

 

Your Employment Search YES

YOUR
EMPLOYMENT SEARCH
(YES)

YES measures and transforms job-search readiness and effectiveness. No matter where job hunters are in their work search, YES leads to a ready-to-use job-search strategy.

  • 3 steps, plus an employment search strategy summary
  • Teaches proven job-seeking skills in 5 key areas
  • Guidance for developing a personal employment search strategy


 

Career Action Resources: Creators of Self-Assessments Used in Workforce Development, Employment Programs, & Career Services

Career Action Resources LLC is the creator of the Layoff-to-Employment Action Planner (LEAP) and Your Employment Search (YES). LEAP and YES are best-practice self-assessments that guide job hunters and the unemployed in job search and reemployment planning.

LEAP and YES are helping thousands of job seekers across the nation in workforce agencies, employment programs, and career centers.

 

Career Action Blog

The U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration (ETA), has introduced WorkforceGPS, its new technical assistance website for workforce development professionals. ETA calls WorkforceGPS “the next generation, device-friendly website for peer-to-peer connection and resources to help you better do your job.”

WorkforceGPS.org has replaced Workforce3One.org, which existed since 2004. 

Meet WorkforceGPS [Career Action Blog]

Here is more information on the new WorforceGPS from ETA:

Background

America’s public workforce investment system provides high-quality services to thousands of individuals and businesses each year. The workforce professionals and other stakeholders who lead and operate that system need access to data, evidence, and information about effective and innovative approaches to maintain those high-quality services in an ever-changing economy. Beginning in 2004, ETA met this need by providing an online learning communication and learning technical assistance platform called Workforce3One. Twelve years later, the site has more than 122,000 regular users and hosts more than 4,000 individual resources. Advancements in technology and the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) have created new demands on the workforce system and new opportunities to share knowledge and technical assistance. Therefore, ETA is replacing its legacy system with WorkforceGPS.org—a modern web platform designed to improve the user experience for its customers.

About WorkforceGPS

WorkforceGPS is an upgraded platform with capabilities that far exceed those of Workforce3One. It gives the public workforce system, education professionals, and business leaders more effective ways to search, save, and share resources—with improved capability to engage with peers. WorkforceGPS is the future of ETA’s technical assistance.

WorkforceGPS is still a committed community of public workforce system stakeholders; it is still a place to find great technical assistance resources and take advantage of online learning opportunities. A key feature of the new website is its consistent look and feel. It is designed to make the user experience easy and uncomplicated across all devices—desktop computers, tablets, or your smart phone—so you can spend less time trying to find the right tools and more time using them.

New Features

  • Straightforward and consistent navigation with a responsive interface. WorkforceGPS can be accessed on your desktop, laptop, and across mobile devices. Additionally, WorkforceGPS and its Communities of Practice and Collections have a consistent site design—once you’re familiar navigating within one Community or Collection, you understand them all. A Collection is a group of resources relevant to a specific topic or target population. A Community of Practice is a group of resources related to a topic or target population, with added features intended to promote peer-to-peer interaction and learning within that community. Additional features include discussion topics, blog posts, and sometimes chat.
  • Search. WorkforceGPS uses an improved search engine tool that allows you to search the entire site or hone in within a specific Community or Collection. Additionally, all content and resources throughout WorkforceGPS are tagged using a comprehensive and consistent taxonomy that ETA developed with the workforce system in mind. This allows you to search for what you need by activity, program, target population, geographic location, industry/sector, or content type.
  • Save. Becoming a registered member has its perks. Once registered, with just a mouse click you can save all your favorite resources for easy retrieval on My WorkforceGPS. Additionally, all webinars that you attend are automatically saved to your user profile under My Events.
  • Share. WorkforceGPS makes it easier than ever to share resources. Not only can you quickly find and save resources, which make them easy to find again for future use, but with a simple mouse click, you can easily send a favorite resource to a peer via email or share it on social media with the hashtag #FoundItOnWFGPS.

Other Key Features

  • You Might Also Like. When you land on a selected resource, WorkforceGPS uses the power of its comprehensive taxonomy to automatically populate a list of other like resources that may also be of use, similar to what you see on many retail websites.
  • Staff Picks & Other Resource Lists. Just like a good bookstore, WorkforceGPS is designed to make it easier for you to find exactly what you are looking for—even if you don’t know precisely what that is. That’s why WorkforceGPS has curated a list of Staff Picks—resources that are highly recommended as best-in-class for users by ETA staff. Wherever you see the Staff Pick icon, it’s worth taking a look. You can also browse resources by additional lists like top-rated resources and recently added content.

Once registered, users can take advantage of the MyWorkforceGPS features—My Profile, My Content, My Events, My Communities, My Membership & Notifications. Users can also join specific Communities and Collections, sign up for site notifications and newsletters, and start curating their own compilation of saved resources.

This post was adapted by Career Action Resources, LLC, from Training and Employment Notice 33-15.

 

Most states are spending about half--or less--of their Rapid Response funds, according to a recent U.S. Department of Labor Employment and Training Administration report.

Rapid Response Funds Spent by States [Career Action Blog]
Below is a table showing the Rapid Response Fund Utilization Rate for the quarter ending June 30, 2015, the most current information available. Nearly $350 million was available to the states for Rapid Response, and more than $161 million was not spent.

Florida spent the lowest amount of its Rapid Response funds. Montana, Ohio, and Utah spent the most of their Rapid Response funds.

State

Percent of Rapid Response Funds Spent

Florida

10.3%

Georgia

17.2%

Delaware

19.8%

Vermont

23.1%

Nebraska

27.1%

Kentucky

27.7%

Iowa

28.4%

Pennsylvania

28.6%

Texas

29.2%

Oregon

29.6%

Michigan

31.8%

Wisconsin

33.6%

Washington

36.5%

Alaska

36.9%

Virginia

36.9%

Mississippi

37.0%

Tennessee

40.2%

Wyoming

40.3%

Kansas

41.9%

Minnesota

43.2%

New Mexico

46.7%

Illinois

47.4%

Colorado

47.6%

Arizona

49.6%

New York

49.7%

District of Columbia

49.9%

New Hampshire

50.4%

Hawaii

52.2%

Idaho

54.5%

Arkansas

54.6%

North Dakota

55.8%

Alabama

57.4%

North Carolina

58.2%

Missouri

58.7%

South Carolina

59.5%

Oklahoma

59.9%

West Virginia

62.8%

Louisiana

66.1%

Rhode Island

66.5%

Maryland

67.6%

Indiana

68.9%

Nevada

72.3%

California

72.6%

Massachusetts

74.6%

South Dakota

77.7%

New Jersey

80.5%

Maine

83.2%

Connecticut

94.7%

Montana

100.0%

Ohio

100.0%

Utah

100.0%

 

 

Image courtesy of xedos4 at Freedigitalphotos.net

 

The U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Labor sent a letter to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) State Workforce Administrators, Workforce Development Boards, and American Job Centers advising them to connect SNAP participants to employment and training programs to help these individuals enter the workforce.

Here is the main content of the letter:

Helping SNAP Participants Under WIOA

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Labor (DOL) are partnering to encourage state Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) agencies and state and local workforce agencies to work together to develop shared strategies that will better connect SNAP participants, specifically able-bodied adults without dependents (ABAWDs), to employment and training opportunities through American Job Centers (AJCs).

Our agencies share a common goal, which is to help low-skilled, low-income, or low-wage individuals find sustainable employment. Both the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) and the Agriculture Act of 2014 (Farm Bill) underscore the importance of connecting low-income individuals to job-driven training activities, breaking down barriers which often impede ABAWDs from successfully entering the workforce.

ABAWDs may only participate in SNAP for three months in any 36-month period unless they are working or participating in an employment and training activity for 80 hours per month or complying with a workfare program. During the economic downturn, due to high levels of unemployment, most states had a waiver of the 3-month time limit. However, as the economy continues to recover, many states are no longer eligible or will not implement such waivers. Participation in workforce programs under WIOA is considered a qualifying activity for the purposes of helping ABAWDs maintain SNAP eligibility. Furthermore, expanding SNAP participants’ access to employment and training services is critical to helping them transition from the program by becoming economically self-sufficient.

One resource available to states to help ABAWDs maintain their eligibility is the SNAP Employment & Training (E&T) program, which is intended to help SNAP participants, including ABAWDs, gain skills, training, or work experience to improve their employability and reduce their need for nutrition assistance. USDA is committed to helping states expand and strengthen their existing programs, and to think strategically about the role other workforce development programs can play in responding to the needs of ABAWDs.

Another resource, the state and local workforce system, specifically the American Job Centers (AJCs) and their partners, provides job seekers with the skills and credentials necessary to secure and advance in employment with family-sustaining wages.

They provide access and opportunities to all job seekers, including individuals with barriers to employment, to prepare for, obtain, retain, and advance in high-quality jobs and high-demand careers.

USDA and DOL encourage you join us in this effort to ensure that low-skilled and low-income individuals obtain the skills and credentials needed to secure employment and increase their earnings. Your close coordination and sharing of information and resources is essential for the delivery of integrated services for SNAP recipients at the state and local levels.

Kevin W. Concannon, Under Secretary, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food, Nutrition and Consumer Service

Portia Wu, Assistant Secretary U.S. Department of Labor, Employment & Training Administration

 

Looking for a tool to help SNAP participants prepare for the job search? Consider Your Employment Search (YES), a straightforward, easy-to-use six-panel foldout by Career Action Resources, LLC. Learn more here.

Also read the related Career Action Blog post, Building Job Search Skills in SNAP E&T Participants.

 

Testimonial
“We love LEAP. It helps the unemployed think of the many issues they are facing and verbalize what they are worried about. We wouldn’t get to some issues without LEAP because people are overwhelmed by stress. LEAP gives the unemployed a tool for moving forward.”
Workforce Program Administrator

“Shows job seekers where to begin and what priorities to focus on…makes the job search more productive.”
Diana Aughe, Career Coach



"LEAP showed me “where my needs are and where to get help.”
Dislocated Worker in Indiana